About your Search

20131101
20131130
SHOW
STATION
KQED (PBS) 12
WMPT (PBS) 3
WETA 2
LANGUAGE
English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
on talks with iran; curbing the cost of health care in massachusetts; what judicial gridlock means for the federal courts; and the legacy of lincoln's most famous speech. >> ifill: j.p. morgan's $13 billion settlement brings months of delicate, high stakes negotiations to an end. under the terms of the deal, $4 billion will go to struggling homeowners in the form of reduced mortgage payments, lower loan rates and other assistance, $7 billion will go to investors as compensation; the remainder will be fines paid by the bank. the agreement comes as investigators are said to be pursuing cases against other financial institutions. some assessment now of the deal's significance and its problems. lynn stout is a professor of business law at cornell university. she closely watches financial regulation. and bert ely is a banking consultant. what's your first sense of this deal? was it a good deal for anybody? >> well, i think as much as anything else it gets these problems behind jane morgan chase. they had a tentative deal a few weeks ago but now they can get this behind them and move on
reporters that when the state of massachusetts passed its own law, enrollment there started very slowly, just 123 people in the first month. >> we know experience in the bay >> wooduff: mary agnes carey of kaiser health news is with us again tonight. it's an editorially independent news organization. mary agnes, welcome back to the program. so what did we learn today from the administration's official release of these numbers? >> well, they're lower than expected. administration officials for days, for weeks, have been trying to dampen expectations. these numbers would be great, and they certainly were not. of the 10 6,000 people that have enrolled, you have about a quarter of those through the federal exchanges, and those are in 36 states. that's really a big chunk of states that are being run by the federal government, the exchanges, and then the remaining three-fourths were three the state exchanges set up in about 15 states and the district of column ja. >> woodruff: three to one that number reflects the state exchanges. to what extension is this consistent with what the administrat
turkey. >> reporter: in fact, while the 1621 celebration in plymouth, massachusetts, is sparsely documented, it probably didn't much resemble today's thanksgiving in a lot of ways, including what you might call its economics. the pilgrims, who had already moved toward a cash exchange economy in europe, encountered native people with very different attitudes. toward real estate, for instance. >> the land that was here was for everybody to use. we didn't believe in possessing or owning land. >> reporter: tim turner manages the wampanoag indigenous program at plimoth. >> you might see somebody use a piece of land, but there was never a fence. you were crossing people's property all the time. people were cutting through your homesite all the time. so, our concept of land ownership versus the concept uh that the english had was totally different. >> reporter: also totally different it appears: the wampanoag, though they did trade with each other, weren't profit maximizers. >> you weren't trying to make a profit or look better than anybody else. you took more than everybody else people
storm system, that stretches from texas to massachusetts hurtling eastward bringing high winds and leaving a trail of damage. tornadoes reported in arkansas and southern illinois. in austin texas, yesterday we saw over a hundred water rescues. you can see they are struggling to get the bus out of the river. one thing we learned today, all school kids in the state of kansas are required to practice bus evacuation drills. and we're told that in this case, it might have saved lives. david. >> clayton, thanks to you. brave school children, abc meteorologist tracking all of this. you say we might be dealing with flurries behind it. >> yes. behind the cold front that did this. more than 300 severe weather reports for really much of the nation. you see some of them focused in the northeast and tennessee valley, southern indiana, a lot of wind damage. but behind it, watch this low pressure system, it travels up to the northeast, into canada and behind comes chilly air. not only chilly like detroit in the 40s throughout the weekend but you see snowflakes around the makes, syracuse, pitt
, massachusetts may be doing the same. spending a whopping $500 a month just on heat. >> how much are your heating and gas bills draining you guys? >> it's significant, a vacations we're not taking. or money that's not going to the college fund. >> reporter: but where you might see a warm, inviting home. >> i brought my trusty thermal imaging camera for ya. >> reporter: energy expert is using that ghostbusters looking device, to see money flying right out the doors, and windows. >> we're looking at their front door. >> reporter: see those dark spots? that's cold air sneaking in through their front door. you had no idea? tip number one, weather strip your doors. >> this is a simple fix. will take us just a couple minutes and he'll be warmer all winter. >> reporter: in the living room, we discover more cold air coming in through the windows. but another hidden heat culprit, check out the floors too. >> i can feel a draft. >> reporter: tip number two, seal your base boards and caulk the windows. like that? >> perfect. perfect. so far we slashed $240 off their heating bill but we're not done. down sta
pileup in buffalo new york. from the first flakes flying in massachusetts to this little girl basking in well over a foot in michigan. look at the temperatures slipping into the teens and the 20s in the great lakes and the first full freeze from boston to new york city. tomorrow morning the south is not spared. freezing as far south as dallas and atlanta all the way to the gulf coast. while the below average chill will be short lived, aaa is reminding us it's time to get your vehicles ready. it's always good to keep a bag of cat litter or salt for traction in case your car gets stuck. have a basic tool kit with pliers and an adjustable wrench. finally a penny. yep it's that simple to find out if you need new tires. put it head first into your tire tread. if you can see all of lincoln's head you need new tires. if it goss down past the hairline you're okay. this should be good for this winter. there are more than 600,000 winter related car accidents every year. so grab a penny and do the test tonight. diane. >> great advice as the season begins. thanks so much. >>> tonight a big health
as "quantitative easing." on the democratic side, elizabeth warren of massachusetts complained the fed still isn't doing enough to limit the size and dominance of big banks. >> the truth is if the regulators had done their jobs and reined in the banks, we wouldn't need to be talking about quantitative easing because we could have avoided the 2008 crisis altogether. >> reporter: yellen agreed with the need to increase monitoring of the financial system. she also noted that the government shutdown and debt ceiling brinksmanship have hindered efforts to boost the economy. looking ahead, yellen pledged to continue the push by outgoing fed chairman ben bernanke for greater transparency in what the fed is doing and how. >> woodruff: now to our newsmaker interview with b. todd jones, the new director of the federal bureau of alcohol, firearms, tobacco and explosives. the agency, charged with keeping track of the nation's 300 million guns, lacked a permanent head for the last seven years. jones was appointed shortly after the tragic shooting at sandy hook elementary in newtown, connecticut, and confirme
, as governor deval patrick laid a wreath at the kennedy statue, outside the massachusetts statehouse. >> ♪ oh beautiful... ♪ america, america ♪ >> across the >> reporter: across the city, music marked the day at the john f. kennedy presidential library and museum. ♪ and excerpts of his speeches were read aloud, including the address to the nation on civil rights, in june of 1963, five months before the assassination. >> we are confronted primarily with a moral issue. it is as old as the scriptures and as clear as the american constitution. the heart of the question is whether all americans are to be afforded equal rights and equal opportunities. >> reporter: the remembrances extended around the world as well. in britain, kennedy's granddaughter-- tatiana schlossberg-- laid a wreath at a memorial to the slain president. >> we have come here today to honor his memory as this monument does so well. but today is a difficult day as it is a reminder of a moment of profound sadness for my family, for america and for the world. >> reporter: and back in washington, the 44th president met with
was auctioned off at sotheby's in new york. it was printed in 1640 by the leaders of the massachusetts bay colony. only 11 copies are known to survive. auctioneer david redden explained what the buyer intends to do with it. >> it sold for $14 million to david rubenstein a philanthropist who will be sharing it with libraries around this country and eventually putting it on long term deposit at one of those libraries. >> ifill: the seller of the book was boston's old south church, which sold it to finance its ongoing ministries. the church still has another copy. president obama kicked off the thanksgiving holiday early at the white house today with the traditional annual turkey pardon. flanked by his daughters, the president officially saved a bird named "popcorn" from ending up on a thanksgiving table. a second, back-up turkey named "caramel" was also pardoned but didn't appear at the ceremony. pardoned turkeys end up at george washington's mount vernon estate in virginia. still to come on the "newshour": another delay for the health care law; the bribery scandal that's rocked the navy; te
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)